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shopbot -- routerish things. MIT

CNC desktop systems:

Levil (Oviedo, FL ) LV350D basic, LV350D plus, WL400

  • max part size: 14x10x8 max travel (16.5x8.5x8 for WL400)
  • machine size, weight: 20 x 28 x 30 inch, 200 lbs
  • resolution: 0.00003 inch
  • repeatibility: 0.0001 inch (0.0002 inch for WL400)
  • quoted accuracy: 0.001 inch over whole workspace
  • motors: brush DC servos
  • spindle: to 10,000 rpm (manual control),
    • up to 18,000 rpm for LV350D plus and WL400, 2 Hp spindle with toolchanger (up to 15 tools)
  • supposedly OK for "soft metals" AL etc.
  • cost: $8,950 for LV350D basic, $15,250 for LV350D plus, $16,850 for LW400
  • features: provision for 4th axis control, fancier "like G-code" built-in interpolation & etc., 15mm Hiwin linear guideways, , software "open architecture in Delphi", aluminum structural elements. WL400 has acrylic enclosure.

ACT DMC-III (Granada Hills, CA 91344)

  • max part size: 12x8x6 inch
  • machine size, weight: 27 x 30 x 31 inch, 260 lbs
  • resolution: 0.00008 inch
  • repeatibility: 0.0004 inch
  • quoted accuracy: 0.001 inch over whole workspace
  • motors: "microstep" sine wave stepper axes, brushless spindle
  • spindle: 1500-12000 rpm, 1/3 Hp computer controlled speed
  • supposedly OK for small stainless steel (< 1/8 thick) with sufficient spindle speed
  • cost: ? $10K or less
  • features: provision for 4th axis control, HIWIN 20mm twin type linear guideways, cast iron structural elements

Tormach PCNC1100 -- This is a larger machine. (Maybe too big for in-lab?) This may be the one Prototype This! used.

  • max part size: 18x9.5x16 inch
  • machine size, weight: 56 x 45 x 60 inch, 1130 lbs
  • resolution: 0.0001 inch
  • repeatibility: ?
  • quoted accuracy: 0.001 inch
  • motors: "microstep" stepper axes
  • spindle: 100-5100 rpm, 1.5 Hp computer controlled speed
  • supposedly OK for small stainless steel (< 1/8 thick) with sufficient spindle speed
  • cost: ~$8K
  • features: probably more rigid than the systems above; 4th axis option; traditional axis ways

Premade CNC version of Sieg(?): http://www.syilamerica.com/product_X4.asp , http://www.syilamerica.com/product_X4_plus.asp -- this looks pretty reasonable. Looks like CNC conversion of Chinese mill.


 Cheaper systems more aimed at hobby market:

Seig X3 mini mill (various people have done CNC conversions): http://www.mini-lathe.com/X3_mill/Sx3rvw/SX3-4.htm

MACH hobby mill: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=66051

lathe-mill http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=44142

A more expensive 5 axis with rather small working volume: http://www.microlution-inc.com/products/5100.php

3 axis version: http://www.microlution-inc.com/products/363.php

Precision CNC Routers

Larger workspace, lower rigidity. But in some cases, very good precison.

Datron Dynamics has some interesting offerings. Maybe too large... 60,000 rpm spindle.

Various Chinese CNC routers: http://www.alibaba.com/showroom/mini_cnc_router.html

Page last modified on July 13, 2011, at 12:09 AM